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Police used tear gas to disperse protesters in Suez

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Suez police foils attempt to break into governorate building

Heavy tear gas was fired at protesters in Suez (Photo by Hassan Ghoneima/DNE)

Heavy tear gas was fired at protesters in Suez (Photo by Hassan Ghoneima/DNE)

And Hassan Ghonema

Limited fire erupted at the governorate building in Suez; security managed to extinguish it but the cause of the fire is still unknown.

There are 17 confirmed injuries, mostly bruises or suffocation caused by the tear gas. Protesters burned tires in front of the building to limit the effects of the gas.

During the day, reports of hit-and-runs along with a security alert situation were taking place in front of the governorate building in Suez. Security forces used heavy amounts of tear gas to disperse protesters who tried to break into the building.

Several cases of protesters blacking out due to the tear gas were reported along with eye-witness reports of security officers firing rubber bullets into the air.

Protesters had first gathered at Al-Arbaeen Square in Suez after Friday prayers. Three marches that began at Ghareeb and Al-Shohadaa mosques converged in the square.

DNE correspondent in Suez Hassan Ghonema said protesters chanted against the Supreme Guide of the Muslim Brotherhood Mohamed Badei and accused the Brotherhood of allying with the Supreme Council of Armed Forces against the revolution.

They demanded retribution for the killing of protesters during the 25th of January revolution in 2011 along with events and clashes that followed.

The protesters also chanted against journalists from Al Jazeera until they left the square.

The march then moved from Al-Arbaeen Square to the governorate building amid fears of clashes with security. Protesters were holding large photographs of some who died during the revolution and last year’s Port Said football match


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