Latest in Tag: government Highlight

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Latest in Tag: government


Mohammed Nosseir

Ideas on how Egypt could liberate its traffic congestion

Aimlessly cruising with a private vehicle in a country like Egypt should not be a personal decision, where citizens lose hours in commuting, which leads to increasing pollution and consuming significant amounts of partially subsidised fuel. The chronic problem of Egypt’s traffic congestion constitutes of drivers’ misbehaviour accompanied by no real penalties, using a large …

Mohammed Nosseir

according to the food observatory’s Q3 2012 report, poverty levels in egypt are on the rise, with a staggering 86%
of vulnerable households not being able to currently meet their need (Photo by Hassan Ibrahim/DNE)

Government policies increase poverty, future for the poor seems bleak: expert

Poverty in Egypt will increase throughout the year, as the government did not use the incoming foreign currency to create jobs, according to Aliaa Mamdouh, a former economist at CI Capital Investment Bank. The current economic and social conditions in Egypt are projected to increase the poverty rate in the coming years. The government appears …

Hisham Salah

Erdogan and social media

Erdogan and social media: use and abuse

After using social media to publicly quash the coup, Turkey’s government is cracking down on news sites and purging state institutions again. Here is how censorship works in the country – and how Turks react to it.

Deutsche Welle

Germany's nuclear

Who pays for Germany’s nuclear phase-out?

Germany’s decision a few years ago to phase out nuclear power was an abrupt move. But it still remains unclear who foots the bill for shutting down the nation’s nuclear plants, as utilities seek damages from the state.

Deutsche Welle

Germany sticks to balanced budget policy

Germany sticks to balanced budget policy

The German government has said Europe’s powerhouse will not move away from its budgetary policy of zero fresh borrowing, Brexit or not. It’s Berlin’s way of sending a “signal of continuity,” but not everyone is amused.

Deutsche Welle