Home
Loading...
You are here:  Home  >  Politics  >  Egypt  >  Current Article

Youth groups reject deals with ‘terrorist’ Muslim Brotherhood

  /   26 Comments   /   3021 Views

A statement from the youths of Tamarod, the National Salvation Front and the June 30 Front says it will not stand for foreign intervention “supportive” of terrorism

Tamarod announced it would spearhead a campaign to promote awareness of the upcoming constitutional process (Photo by Aaron T Rose)

Tamarod founders 
(Photo by Aaron T Rose)

The youth from Tamarod, the National Salvation Front and the June 30 Front announced their rejection of a “political deal” with the Muslim Brotherhood.

In a joint statement on Tuesday, the groups expressed concern surrounding the current political scene and “rumors of the intention to create a political deal between the Egyptian state and the Muslim Brotherhood terrorists.”

“The signatories of this statement emphasis its categorical rejection to make any political deals against the aspirations of the Egyptian people,” read the statement, which called for “real transitional justice.”

The group also called on the transitional government to carry out fair and transparent trials and investigations of all those accused of crimes from 25 January 2011 until now.

The statement also called on the security apparatus to swiftly deal with terrorism and violence in accordance with the law, saying: “the Egyptian people stand side-by-side with the Egyptian authorities and security services in the face of terrorism and extremism.”

The collective said it appreciated international efforts “that are consistent with the inherent right of the Egyptian people in confronting terrorism and extremism,” but also said it rejected any international intervention that was “supportive” of terrorism and against the will and sovereignty of the Egyptian people.”

A number of delegations, including ones from the United States and the European Union, have visited Egypt in response to the current rift between groups supporting ousted president Mohamed Morsi and those supporting the change in power that occurred on 3 July.

Supporters of Morsi, who is detained, have continued their sit-ins at Rabaa Al-Adaweya in Nasr City and Al-Nahda Square in front of Cairo University, demanding that the former president be reinstated.

  • deeniman

    I’ve truly grown tired of Tammarod. Some would could consider their actions over the past year ‘terrorist’ in nature. How can you support a coup, and lecture on democracy?

    • Ahmed Bata

      what in the world? when a majority of the electorate tells their president to leave, he leaves or calls for early elections. No questions need to be asked. Why they called for him to leave is their business, and they don’t need to justify it to anyone. The president is only their servant, to stay or leave at their whim. That is democracy.

      • deeniman

        First off the majority of the electorate is not telling the Morsi to leave; I’m Egyptian. 65% of the country would identify as being Islamist. 2ndly, you are only hearing and seeing one side of the story, because Tammarod supporters control the media. The entire process has been undemocratic – suppression of free speech, the threat of violence, and decrees by an appointed president. Once again, how can you support a coup; and celebrate a democracy? You can never have a thriving democracy if your military has the right to remove your sitting president. In a democracy differences are not settled in the streets.

  • DAMNtoMilitaryrule

    As days are going it confirm what I thought about TAMAROD on day one:Anti-democratic group. I won’t be surprised their next statement they will call openly a genocide of MB members. TAMAROD have to learn the difference between mobilisation for a fake demonstration and how to translate your view and vision on the ground.

    • Ahmed Bata

      MB members need to acquiesce to early elections or otherwise minimize their disruptions. The rest of us, the majority, have a right to limit their activities to such, at whatever cost is required.

      • deeniman

        Once again, you are not the majority, you are simply the loudest. You are failing to acknowledge the asessment that the intelligence community is giving Egypt. Western powers are trying to prevent a civil war. Understand if that happens you won’t only being dealing with Egyptian Islamist. There are Ickwani members in the military; no one but Ickwani knows the true number. And Libya is now funneling the same weapons used to overthrow Khadafi into Egypt. Perhaps, you are underestimating the influence of Ickwani, and overestimating your position as Tammarod. The intelligence community predicts and I quote:
        ‘Egypt will have a civil war with part of the army siding with the Islamists and the other part with the effete, militarily useless pro-democracy forces. In such a scenario, the Egyptian Islamists will win, though, as in Syria, it may take a while.
        Your answer to Egypts problems lacked wisdom and far sight. Morsi could have been removed through the Constitution, but instead you called the same military that you hated just a year prior.

        • Ahmed Bata

          no one hated the military a year earlier. Then as now, they are simply carrying out the will of the people. What should the military to do when 30 million people went out to the streets and called for his resignation? you think they would have gone home empty handed? We can keep discussing Morsy’s grassroots support without any resolution, so why not just resort to the ballot box? He should have done so from the beginning. He only garnered 25% of the first round vote. We can either hold early elections, or a referendum on his presidency. His unwillingness to do so is absolutely treasonous, and has lead to this fiasco. And are we supposed to acquiesce to this foreign invasion? Egypt is for all Egyptians, and not for any foreigners.
          When has the threat of violence, especially by foreign insurgents, ever lead to capitulation? I doubt wide scale insurgency will happen. The violence route didn’t go so well for the Ikhwan during Nasser’s time, or during Sadat’s time. Why would they try it again, and risk dissolution? As for Syria, every nation is trying to dissect out the Islamists. They don’t have support, and they may be loosing the hearts and minds of the Syrians. I think their success is very much in doubt, as it is in Tunis.

          Regarding the constitution, it had no presidential recall article, to our regret.

          What’s wrong with the current roadmap? It doesn’t prevent Islamists, Ikhwani or otherwise, from voting again.

          • DAMNtoMilitaryrule

            You can put all of your judgements here but what his clear you cannot change the truth.Oh my god”no one hated military a year earlier” You have discredited yourself with that statement simple as that.

          • deeniman

            First off, there weren’t 30million people out in the streets – mish momkin, google has already admitted as much. The numbers were grossly inflated. It has been estimated that closer to 5million people took to the streets. Even still the numbers are irrelevant, you don’t get a ‘do over’ just because you lost – that’s why there are term limits. If every country played by your rules, there would be coup a day… Think about it; Tammarod didn’t respect Morsi, but they expect Ickwan to respect Adley? Tammarod acts with the force of a brute, lacking wisdom. How many people may die, because of their foolishness?

          • deeniman

            Also, you are once again overstating your position. Please stop watching the Egyptian media – they are idiots, and it’s skewing your view of the world. Jihadis virtually have their own state in Northern Mali. The growth of Jihadis groups has spiked not declined – that’s why it was essential in Egypt to prove to Islamist that they could succeed in a democracy, instead of using force. You’ve proven the opposite.

  • Sam Boulis

    How can anyone sane person calls the Tamarod”anti-democracy, the Tamarod are a group of young Egyptians who saw their country heading the wrong direction, they refused to live under a fascist Islamist dictatorship, can anyone in his/her right mind consider them as democracy loving bunch?, of course not. Let the Egyptian people decide for themselves and not confuse democracy with fascism!

    • deeniman

      You can’t call for the physical removal of an elected president by the army, and yet still claim to be democratic. The two are contradictory. You don’t settle disputes in the streets in a democracy.

      • Ahmed Bata

        Ours is a nascent democracy. Leaders need to be sensitive to this level of public anger. Morsy should have called for early elections to prove his popularity then. This kind of thing happens all the time in parliamentary democracies all the time, such as Italy. By any measure, the level of public dissent is huge. I attended a rally 2 weeks ago @ ettehadiyah and walked about 4 kms of shoulder to shoulder humanity…Morsy’s election numbers are flimsy, and he made a huge mistake by overstating his position. You don’t strong-arm people, because you think you have a mandate from God. This is how you get Iran. Only the military has saved Turkey from a similar fate. Which country would you prefer Egypt emulate? Why are we even risking this conflict? Another election will settle the issue. If the brothers are as popular as you believe, we would all know it then, should they win. Until then, the secular majority that split their vote, will not tolerate him. Happy Eid.

        • deeniman

          You see; you are doing it again, you don’t get to rewrite the rules in the middle of the game. He won an election that guranteed him 4 years – why would he ever agree to an early election? 2ndly why would he ever expect Tammarod to respect the results – after they didn’t accept it the first go round? And 3rdly, Iran is suffering because of sanctions not because it’s an Islamic state. 4thly, you would have to tell me why Tammarod would risk the potential for conflict that now exist. I keep saying their actions lacked wisdom and far sight. Anyone could have told you that if forcefully removed Morsi you’d risk a civil war. Who wants a Syria in side of Egypt? Eid Kareem.

          • Ahmed Bata

            My guess is all were hoping Morsy would resign. But no president is guaranteed his full term. He can be recalled, and he can be impeached.

          • deeniman

            There you ago, we agree on something; a legal impeachment, done through the courts, and not in the streets.

      • Ahmed Bata

        I don’t agree with your position that “the numbers are irrelevant.” Its a right of the people, and I hope its gets added to the constitution. Collect enough signatures, and you trigger a recall referendum on the president…

      • Sam Boulis

        In the middle east you do, remember, they never had a democracy ever!

  • DAMNtoMilitaryrule

    “The signatories of this statement emphasis its categorical rejection to make any political deals against the aspirations of the Egyptian people,”

    That statement is dangerous and does not not reflect a group with open mind into democracy. It is a discriminatory statement. Tamarod =anti-democracy

  • Sam Boulis

    Deeniman, you are wrong, there is no 65% Islamist in Egypt, Morsi won the election with only 13%, besides he had no business running for a president since he was a prison escapee.

  • Sam Boulis

    So, are you saying the Tamarods anti-democracy? and the fascist Islamist a democracy?, I’m sorry to say that you are ill-informed.

  • Sam Boulis

    It’ late here, time to hit the hay, later!

  • Mahmud Abdullah

    Democratically elected president Mohammed Morsi, who hails from Muslim Brotherhood, was toppled by staging a military coup d’etat; hundreds of pro-democracy and anti-coup peaceful protesters, mostly Muslim Brotherhood activists, were brutally murdered by army-men, police and pro-coup armed thugs. Where these are the realities, the so called Tamarod making unsuccessful efforts to portray MB as a ‘terrorist’ group; it is unfair, unacceptable and worrying. Tamarod will have to stand in the dock of history for paving way for and for supporting the military coup d’etat against a president who was elected by the citizens of Egypt through a free, fair and internationally-accepted election. The activities, actions and the philosophy of Tamarod are not only incompatible with democracy but also pose threats to peaceful co-existence of all people of Egyptian societies.

    • Sam Boulis

      Abdullah, you really are a funny guy, why are so stuck on the so called”democratically elected president”, I have tried to explain to you that he was not fit to run for office in the first place, he is a prison escapee, in another words, he is a FELON!

  • Islam Maged

    tamarud has been always a racist fascist group who bear gradge and hatred towards the islamic movement we are not calling for any dialogue with such movement the dialogue is going to be in squares and strikes till we get back our elected president and withdraw this fascit regime

  • Sam Boulis

    Islam, How dare call the Tamarod group fascist, do you really understand what fascism is?, maybe not, if you really look closer, you will find that Islamists, Brother Hoodlums and Ikhwan to be the true fascists!


You might also like...

UN fact-finding committee to focus on human rights defenders: CIHRS

Read More →