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Review: Commentaries denounce Morsy’s call for dialogue

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After President Mohamed Morsy met with a number of politicians in a new round of dialogue talks, several opinion writers have denounced the move, believing it is another failed attempt at fruitless dialogue.

 

Replacing the cabinet is the first solution

Diaa Rashwan

Al-Masry Al-Youm

Diaa Rashwan

Rashwan believes that the only way out of this crisis is to replace the cabinet. Almost all Egyptians, political groups and even Islamist parties are aware that Essam Sharaf’s government has proven to be a great failure.

The writer criticises Morsy’s attempt to restart another round of dialogue. The national dialogue which started on Monday did not have a clear plan. It was notable that Islamist parties were the only attendees; where as the National Salvation Front (NSF) continued to boycott Morsy and his negotiations.

Amid all the deadly clashes occurring across the country, Rashwan criticises Morsy’s latest speech and his decision to declare a state of emergency in three canal cities; Suez, Ismailia and Port Said.  Morsy left out the option of removing the government and preferred to threaten and warn Egyptians against the violence spreading across the country. Despite repeated attempt to start serious dialogue with political groups, Rashwan believes Morsy will not contain the situation before sacking Qandil’s government.

 

A fragile structure

Amr Al-Shobaki

Al-Masry Al-Youm newspaper

Amr Al-Shobaki

Why will the current national dialogue fail? Why did all Morsy’s initiatives fail before? Why will the coming period be worse than before? Al-Shobaki says because the foundations of the entire political system aren’t solid. He argues that every new storey built above the other will lead – sooner or later – to collapse because the building was not built correctly. Starting dialogue with the president or boycotting it is not the main problem for Al-Shobaki.

He says those who attended the “fake” dialogue meeting like the Strong Egypt Party have lost popularity in the street. Also, those who boycotted it, like the NSF, have also lost trust from many Egyptians. Al-Shobaki refers to the initiative proposed by Abdel Moneim Abul Fotouh, head of the Strong Egypt Party, and said that he mentioned Khairat El-Shater as part of those entitled to dialogue.

El-Shater does not hold an official political position in the country, yet many Egyptians know that he orchestrates a lot of closed door decisions, being one of the most senior leaders in the Muslim Brotherhood. Al-Shobaki believes that Morsy’s administration will eventually fall because he has not set solid building blocks for his regime. He relied heavily on the Muslim Brotherhood and started to paint the country’s institutions with his group’s preferred colours.

 

Who attacked the revolution’s virginity?

Wael Qandil

Al-Shorouk newspaper

Wael Qandil

Qandil criticises the recent incidents of mob sexual attacks that were reported over the past few days during demonstrations in Tahrir Square. He condemns the passiveness of many activists who have not reacted to video clips or reports that counted over 20 females being harassed publicly in city squares.

The writer narrates a story of a 19-year-old female protester who was found unconscious in the street after being brutally assaulted by a group of men during a demonstration. The girl was taken to a police station and a police report has been written, but no more action was taken.

Qandil expresses his frustration with the indifference affecting society towards such issues. Although several female activists have come out with details of the attacks, not one government official has made a statement to condemn the situation or decided to investigate the extent of the phenomenon. Regardless of the silence of many officials, Qandil is shocked to see the revolution being damaged by these incidents.


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