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ElBaradei came to divide Egypt: Shafiq

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“I do not know if I will nominate myself for presidency again”

South Cairo Criminal Court announced it would decide a verdict during its next hearing on 4 May in the case examining allegedly illicit gains by former regime figures through the Land Pilots Association. The defendants include Ahmed Shafiq, Nabil Shukri, Alaa and Gamal Mubarak (AFP Photo)

Former presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq
(AFP File Photo)

Former presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq said that former vice-president Mohamed ElBaradei was “on a mission to divide Egypt” on Wednesday night.

In a phone call with Studio El Balad talk show on Sada El Balad (The Country’s Echo) TV channel, he said that ElBaradei’s current visit to Russia is personal, but  may “serve other goals that he did not  wish to disclose.”

Shafiq said that he does not know if he would nominate himself for the presidency, and that such a decision would depend on “conditions and changes happening rapidly in Egypt.”

He accused Judge Tarek El Beshry’s committee (responsible for constitutional amendments of March 2011) of helping the Muslim Brotherhood to “reign over Egypt,” urging that the same course should not be taken during the current transitional phase.

Shafiq said he hoped that the parliamentary elections would be held after at least one year, to guarantee a “reasonable” result, and to “get rid of the Brotherhood’s influence on the poor and ignorant”.

Shafiq, a former aviation minister who was appointed prime minister by former president Hosni Mubarak on 28 January 2011, said that the current constitutional amendments might result in a ” new constitution”.

He thanked Arab nations, especially Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates, for their recent support to Egypt.

Shafiq, who left the country following former president Morsi’s victory in 2012 presidential elections by a slim margin, refused to disclose the timing of his return to Egypt.

“If the Brotherhood incited chaos and killings during my reign if I were president, I would make them return to prisons,” he said.

  • Reda Sobky

    It is undemocratic to diminish and demonize other patriots” motives just because one disagrees with them. Opposing the forced removal of the protesters is a legitimate position for a patriot to take even though the mainstream in Egypt seemed to support the clearing out. Democratic discourse requires some degree of respect for differing points of view, and that is the case with Dr El Baradie. Those who wished to see this group out of politics grabbed the opportunity to show how bad they are-utimately thugs and degenerates- and exclude them as an entity. The deposed group fell for the temptation to try terror techniques and thus completely disqualified themselves and removed any sympathy left in the mainstream. It is indeed a tragedy of errors and unintended consequences setting in motion secondary events which then confound the outcome. What if the deposed group had chosen nonviolence and refused to collaborate with the Sinai invaders and defended minority security and inclusion, a different outcome could have obtained especially if they had shown leadership and mobilized the best and the brightest instead of just loyalists. A Zen saying goes, “the more extreme your adversary is, the more likely you are to prevail.. the most difficult adversary is one who uses reason” and the deposed group did not use reason and logic and their motives were shadowy and their actions flawed and thus brought about their own disqualification and dissolution.

  • paniniedirisinhe

    ElBaradei appears to me to be one of the most principled politicians to be found anywhere. Most of what I know of the Egyptian people I learnt from fellow teachers in a Gulf state.

    However, I also moved around a lot with a Copt who was an Economic adviser in the Maldive Islands. And there is a long life that I have spent in my own troubled country, Sri Lanka.

    There are very few people who have the decency to move away when they see that they either have to appease a rabble or get drawn in to being figureheads who are unable to exercise any control over events.

    I have been closely following events in Egypt for three years; ElBaradei has done the right thing; he has withdrawn. Despite all the taunts at him, he will still be alive, hopefully, if his country really needs him five years from now. If they don’t want him, I sincerely pray that this man of peace may die a quiet death in his bed when his time comes, knowing that he has lived a good life – in which he has achieved more than most people.

    Oh! If only the world knows how much we suffer not only because we live under a cruel regime, but also have no alternative because of a Leader of the Opposition who refuses to make way for an abler man!

    Ahmed Safiq, you are welcome to try your own hand at this; but you don’t have to “diminish” a less ambitious man.

  • abdul .a. shaiky

    it is funy.!!

    when he was with sisi,he was holy.now he is a sheatan.
    where is freedom of choice.??
    in turkey, in past army played same role as they are playing in Egypt.
    both armies are sponsored by democratic America.!!! SEE YOUR SELF.!!
    This man is ADNAN MANDERES, prime minister of turkey between 1950 n 1960, won 3 consecutive general elections in 1950, 1954 n 1957,and was hanged by turkish arm…y in 1960 because he allowed AZZAN in arabic (that was banned by mustafa kamal) and gave a statement that shriat may be adopted as the law of the state if turkish parliament wants to do so. MEN give their lives for the cause, he is dead but his name is alive, thousands of schools roads and hospitals in turkey have been named after him including many international turkish universities. RIP
    what a democracy.!!! HYPOCRATES.!!!


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