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Fisheries Authority concerned by Ethiopian dam

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Fisheries Authority head: ‘Egypt is facing a real disaster’

Egypt has long received the largest share of the water from the Nile, as per agreements signed in 1929 and 1959, which guaranteed Egypt 55.5bn cubic metres annually of the estimated total of 84bn cubic metres. (AFP Photo)

Egypt has long received the largest share of the water from the Nile, as per agreements signed in 1929 and 1959, which guaranteed Egypt 55.5bn cubic metres annually of the estimated total of 84bn cubic metres.
(AFP Photo)

Head of the Fisheries Authority Amani Ismail has warned of the threat posed to Egypt by the construction of a dam in Ethiopia.

Writing on the authority’s official website, Ismail said: “There is no longer room for doubt that Egypt is facing a real disaster in the coming months.” She said that the impending disaster is a result of the Minister of Water Resources and Irrigation Mohamed Baha’a El-Din’s recognition of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) project.

Ismail highlighted that the GERD will change the course of the Blue Nile, a tributary of the Nile. She believes that this will cause Egypt and Sudan to lose out on 18m cubic metres of water and reduce the electricity produced by the Aswan Dam by approximately 25%-30%.

Ismail accused the governments of President Mohamed Morsi and former president Hosni Mubarak of not taking action to prevent these losses.

Ismail’s criticisms come after Baha’a El-Din asserted that Egypt is committed to fair distribution of the water from the Nile.

The GERD has led to strained relations with Sudan and Egypt, as it will greatly reduce the amount of water flow and consequentially reduce their share of Nile water.

In September 2012 Egypt denied allegations of a plot to bomb the GERD. The story was printed by a Sudanese newspaper that cited whistle-blowing website WikiLeaks as a source.

Egypt has long received the largest share of the water from the Nile, as per agreements signed in 1929 and 1959, which guaranteed Egypt 55.5bn cubic metres annually of the estimated total of 84bn cubic metres.

Egypt has held a number of meetings and consultations on the issue, including talks with Burundi and Sudan. In January, Egypt refused to sign the Entebbe agreement with other Nile-basin countries. Baha’a El-Din claimed that it was not suitable for downstream countries like Egypt.

 

About the author

Joel Gulhane

News Reporter

Joel Gulhane is a journalist with an interest in Egyptian and regional politics. Follow him on Twitter @jgulhane

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  • yo

    “If Egyptian going to touch GERD (Great
    Ethiopian Renaissance Dam), the consequence will on Aswan Dam!”

  • DE

    For many Africans, it is an insult for Egypt to even think
    about claiming Nile as its own water. This water comes from Africa and it
    belongs to all Africa.

    Did Egypt ever consult with other African countries when it
    built the Aswan Dam from the Nile River? Did Egypt consult with other African
    countries when it built the Assiut Barrage from the Nile River? Did Egypt
    consult with other African countries when it built the Aswan Low Dam on the Nile River? Did Egypt consult with other African
    countries when it built the Ibrahimiya Canal on the left bank of the
    Nile? Did Egypt consult with other countries when it was engaged building all
    its systems of basin irrigation out of the Nile river?

    No, No, No, No, No …..

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  • [email protected]

    I don’t think that threatening one country over the other
    is a solution for the problem. What we must understand is the river is common
    water resources that should utilized in fairly distributed manner without
    affecting the interest of other country. Here, everybody should understand that
    Ethiopia, which is the largest contributor for the river course, has been
    suffering with drought and famine for the last several years, which could have
    been reverted had this river been utilized in earlier times. Now, I think its
    time to change the course of history, a time to say good bye for drought,
    famine through using all the available domestic natural resources without
    affecting the well-being of neighboring country. I think, the world should understand
    that no deliberate action can be taken with sheer intention of harming others
    but for the purpose of its malnourished people, every available resource has to
    be committed. Saving life is above all the deriving motive behind GERD
    construction.

  • Pingback: Irrigation minister: future negotiations with Ethiopia hinge on IPoE report - Daily News Egypt

  • Pingback: Irrigation minister: Egypt not opposed to Renaissance Dam - Daily News Egypt

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