Home
Loading...
You are here:  Home  >  Politics  >  Egypt  >  Current Article

6 April march demanding justice for Jika

  /   No Comments   /   357 Views

Members of the youth group march from Abdeen Court to the High Court calling for justice

6 April march from Abdeen Court to the High Court calling for justice for Jika( Photo by Joel Gulhane)

6 April march from Abdeen Court to the High Court calling for justice for Jika( Photo by Joel Gulhane)

Members of the youth group march from Abdeen Court to the High Court calling for justice

Members of the 6 April Youth Movement marched from Abdeen Court to the Egyptian High Court of Justice in Downtown Cairo on Wednesday, demanding justice for the death of the one of its members, 16-year-old Gaber “Jika” Salah.

The group assembled outside Abdeen Court waving flags and banners depicting Salah’s face as they marched the short distance to the High Court. Drums accompanied their chants calling for justice for Salah. In addition they chanted against President Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood.

Mohamed Alaa, who was coordinating the march by stopping traffic along the route, said: “We want justice for Jika. We know who did it and we want to ensure they are punished.” He added that he wanted to see the accused receive the death penalty.

The march caused a backlog of traffic in Cairo’s downtown streets as the group stopped in different places along the route.

A pair of younger members went ahead of the march to spray graffiti of the now-iconic image of Salah’s face.

As the march arrived at the High Court a police officer was seen looking out of one of the windows of the court building. The marchers shouted in his direction and made lewd hand gestures to which the officer laughed, giving them a thumbs-up.

The march grew when it reached the court to nearly 200 participants and spectators.

Police were stationed earlier that day in front of the High Court in anticipation of the march.

A 6 April member going by the name “Masry” said that he and his fellow members do not fear the police. “Our members die all the time. If we don’t fight, we die, and if we do, we die, so why does it matter that the police are there?”

The march and subsequent demonstration outside the court remained peaceful without police intervention.

Salah died in November during clashes between demonstrators and police in Mohamed Mahmoud Street. He was shot in the back of the head and fell into a coma. He succumbed to his injuries five days later. Thousands turned out for his funeral.

 

About the author

Joel Gulhane

News Reporter

Joel Gulhane is a journalist with an interest in Egyptian and regional politics. Follow him on Twitter @jgulhane


You might also like...

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry 
(Getty Images/AFP//File, Alex Wong)

Hamas has fundamental choice to make: Kerry

Read More →