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Anti-regime protests spill over to Sudan - Daily News Egypt

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Anti-regime protests spill over to Sudan

Over the past week police have been firing tear gas, beating protestors with batons, as well as conducting mass arrests of activists.


The protests which started in Khartoum University spread to other universities and other parts of Khartoum. The protests also spread outside the capital to other cities in Sudan including Omdourman, which is the country’s largest city, as well as Sennar state, Obayed, and Wad Medani. The student-led demonstrations still remain limited in comparison to the widespread protests that swept over several Arab countries over the past 20 months.
Security responded to the protests with a brutal crackdown on protestors as well as on journalists. Over the past week police have been firing tear gas, beating protestors with batons, as well as conducting mass arrests of activists. In Khartoum, protestors were reportedly beaten by plain-clothed policemen who attacked the protestors using machetes iron clubs.
Since the start of the demonstrations, at least two foreign journalists and one Sudanese blogger have been arrested. Egyptian journalist, Salma El-Wardani was arrested on Thursday; she was questioned for
five hours then released. In a press release by Amnesty International, the human rights organisation said that the “Sudanese authorities must end the ruthless crackdown on protests and harassment of journalists covering demonstrations”.
Saata Ahmed Al-Haj, head of the opposition Sudanese Commission for Defence of Freedoms and Rights told AP that hundreds of protestors have been arrested over the past couple of days. Al-Haj said they were eventually released, but that they were tortured during their incarceration. Most reported being flogged and stripped naked.
This is not the first wave of protests to hit Sudan. Following the onset of protests in Egypt and Tunisia last year, protests started in Sudan and have continued sporadically over the past year and a half. Yet, these series of protests seem to be the most determined to bring down President Omar Hassan Al-Bashir – who has been ruling Sudan since 1989.
Sudan has recently been divided into two countries, Sudan and South Sudan. The split has taken a heavy toll on the country’s economy which has a failing currency and an annual inflation rate of 30.4 percent.

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https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/2012/06/24/anti-regime-protests-spill-sudan/
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