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Brotherhood leaders’ detention renewed

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Those detained are accused of inciting violence against protesters in front of Muslim Brotherhood headquarters on 30 June

Ousted president Mohammed Morsi supporters and anti Morsi protesters hurl stones at each other as they clash near Egypt's landmark Tahrir square on July 5, 2013 in Cairo.  (AFP Photo)

Ousted president Mohammed Morsi supporters and anti Morsi protesters hurl stones at each other as they clash near Egypt’s landmark Tahrir square on July 5, 2013 in Cairo.
(AFP Photo)

By Nourhan Dakroury

The detention of four Muslim Brotherhood leaders was renewed for an additional 15 days on Wednesday.

Deputy Supreme Guide of the Brotherhood Khairat El-Shater, Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) head Saad Al-Katatni, former Supreme Guide Mahdi Akef and senior Brotherhood leader Rashad Bayoumi, have all been accused of inciting violence against protesters in front of the Brotherhood’s headquarters on 30 June, reported Aswat Masriya.

Faysal El-Sayed, a Brotherhood lawyer, said the four are being detained and investigated at Tora Prison.

Following former president Mohamed Morsi’s ouster on 3 July, a number of arrest warrants were issued against Brotherhood members, with many being detained.

Al-Katatni and Bayoumi were arrested on 3 July, while El-Shater was arrested on 5 July, with the public prosecution ordering their detention for 15 days on 6 July.

The prosecution then issued arrest warrants for senior Brotherhood member Mohamed Al-Beltagy, preacher Safwat Hegazy and FJP Vice-Chairman Essam Al-Erian on 7 July.


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Al-Jazeera channel's Australian journalist Peter Greste (L) and Egyptian journalist Mohamed Baher stand inside the defendants cage during their trial for allegedly supporting the Muslim Brotherhood at the police institute near Cairo's Tora prison on June 1, 2014. The high-profile case that sparked a global outcry over muzzling of the press is seen as a test of the military-installed government's tolerance of independent media, with activists fearing a return to autocracy three years after the Arab Spring uprising that toppled Hosni Mubarak. 

(AFP PHOTO / KHALED DESOUKI)

UPDATE: Al Jazeera’s Peter Greste out of prison

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