Home
Loading...
You are here:  Home  >  Culture  >  Current Article

Movie previews

  /   No Comments   /   201 Views

New in the movies

The Last Stand

8-2a

There’s a new Arnold Schwarzenegger in town, which means explosions, death and car chases. Though the escapism element might be redundant given the state of Cairo these days, Arnold does command an army of loyal fans who will go see it anyway.

Our favourite orange-coloured actor/governor plays a sheriff who moves from LA to a sleepy town after an operation leaves him wallowing in regret.

After fighting small-town crime in Sommerton Junction, his world is shattered when a drug kingpin makes an outlandish escape from an FBI convoy.

Critics were impressed with the action sequences in this one but said its serious moments ruined it. The film marks Schwarzenegger’s return to cinema after a lengthy absence.

“[H]andles the action sequences effectively if not spectacularly, though The Last Stand could have dispensed with the occasional attempts at sobriety and cut straight to the chase (or chases),” said Connie Ogle of the Miami Herald.

TIME magazine put it best: “Slapdash in its character portraits, the movie is slambang in its action scenes; it springs to life whenever it promises death.”

Just wait for the DVD.

Showing at: Renaissance Sun City, Renaissance Nile City Cinema, Renaissance Metro Cairo, Renaissance 6th of October, Dandy Mall, Alexandria: Renaissance San Stefano, Renaissance City Centre.

 

The Bay

8-2b

The Bay revives the two niche genres of ecological horror and found footage horror. The small town of Claridge, Maryland has witnessed a disaster that is only now getting uncovered. Millions of fish wash ashore, birds drop from the sky; the usual.

Using people’s phones, webcams, etc the footage that was once buried by the authorities is being uncovered and the truth, that a deadly parasite once claimed the lives of 700 people, is getting out.

The film stylistically follows Cloverfield and other films that use seemingly amateur footage as a narrative tool.

Called a “faux eco-documentary” by Roger Ebert, the film may not have lived up to its hype, but its efforts at raising the bar in this particular genre have been recognised by some.

The Washington Post said, “Like a Blair Witch Project for thinking adults, one that’s scary in two distinct ways.”

If you like millions of dollars being spent to make a film look like grainy footage from your old Nokia phone, then go ahead. If not, then not.

Showing at: Galaxy, Stars Cinema, Plaza Cinema.


You might also like...

Qahera, the hijab-clad super heroine fights harassers and protects women.

(Photo handout from Qahera- the Superhero Facebook page.)

The art of fighting sexual harassment

Read More →